Rebuilding The Singapore Airlines & Scoot Route Network

The Singapore Airlines Group is getting its mojo back after two years of tough flying conditions. Along with Singapore, most countries have now relaxed entry conditions, allowing for people to start easily moving again. The Singapore Airlines Group recently reported its first quarterly profit since the start of the pandemic and is now rebuilding its route network and boosting frequencies. As of March 25, 2022, the Singapore Airlines Group is flying to 24 countries on five continents – and this is the most up-to-date list of their destinations.


The Singapore Airlines Group, which covers Singapore Airlines and its low-cost subsidiary Scoot, is flying to seven countries in West Asia and Africa, two countries in the Southwest Pacific, nine countries in Southeast Asia, three countries in North Asia, ten countries in Europe, and two countries in North America. In several of these countries, the Singapore Airlines Group flies to more than one destination.

Singapore Airlines & Scoot destinations in West Asia and Africa

Across the West Asia and African region, Singapore Airlines and Scoot flies to 20 destinations, including 13 destinations in India. Singapore Airlines is flying to Dhaka (DAC) in Bangladesh, Male (MLE) in The Maldives, Kathmandu (KTM) in Nepal, Colombo (CMB) in Sri Lanka, and Johannesburg (JNB) and Cape Town (CPT) in South Africa. Scoot is flying to Jeddah (JED) in Saudi Arabia.


India is getting a mix of Singapore Airlines and Scoot flights. Singapore Airlines is flying to Ahmedabad (AMB), Bengaluru (BLR), Chennai (MAA), Delhi (DEL), Kochi (COK), Kolkata (CCU), and Mumbai (BOM). Scoot is flying to Amritsar (ATQ), Coimbatore (CJB), Tiruchirappalli (TRZ), Trivandrum (TRV), and Visakhapatnam (VTZ). Both Singapore Airlines and Scoot fly to Hyderabad (HYD).


Airbus-A32-neo-Scoot

Scoot is flying to SIA Groups on its own or in conjunction with its parent airline. Photo: Airbus

Southwest Pacific and North American flights

Down in the Southwest Pacific, Singapore Airlines in flying to Auckland (AKL) and Christchurch (CHC) in New Zealand. Across the Tasman Sea, the airline is flying to Adelaide (ADL) and Brisbane (BNE). Flights to Cairns (CNS) and Darwin (DRW) start on Tuesday, March 29. Both Singapore Airlines and Scoot is flying to Sydney (SYD), Melbourne (MEL), and Perth (PER), while the Gold Coast (OOL) is exclusively served by Scoot.


Across to North America, Singapore Airlines is flying to Vancouver (YVR) in Canada, and Houston (IAH), Los Angeles (LAX), San Francisco (SFO), Seattle (SEA) and New York (JFK) in the USA. From Monday, Singapore Airlines is resuming its flights New York Newark (EWR).

15 SIA European destinations across 10 countries

Skipping over to Europe, Singapore Airlines and Scoot fly to 15 cities. This includes three destinations in Germany – Frankfurt (FRA), Munich (MUC), and Berlin (SXF). Note that Scoot operates the Berlin flights. In the United Kingdom, Scoot is flying to London Gatwick (LGW) while Singapore Airlines flies to London Heathrow (LHR) and Manchester (MAN).

Scoot’s sole other Europe destination is Athens (ATH), while Singapore Airlines flies to Denmark’s capital of Copenhagen (CPH), Milan (MXP) and Rome (FCO) in Italy, Paris Charles de Gaulle (CDG), Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport (AMS) , Barcelona (BCN), Zurich (ZUR) and Turkey’s Istanbul Airport (IST).


Singapore-Airlines-Boeing-777-300

Singapore Airlines handles the bulk of the SIA Group’s European flying. Photo: Singapore Airlines

Singapore Airlines & Scoot’s North Asian destinations

In North Asia, China remains well serviced by the Singapore Airlines Group despite China remaining mostly closed. Scoot flies to Macao (MFM), Tianjin (TSN), and Guangzhou (CAN). Singapore Airlines flies to Shanghai (PVG) and Chongqing (CKG). Both Singapore Airlines and Scoot fly to Hong Kong SAR (HKG) and Shenzhen (SZX).

Japan is exclusively served by Singapore Airlines flights, with current destinations including Fukuoka (FUK), Tokyo Narita (NRT), Tokyo Haneda (HND), Osaka (ITM), and Nagoya (NGO). Elsewhere in North Asia, Singapore Airlines flies to Taipei (TPE) while both Singapore Airlines and Scoot fly to Seoul (ICN).

Singapore and Scoot’s comprehensive Southeast Asian network

Closer to home, Singapore Airlines and Scoot fly to 24 destinations in nine countries in Southeast Asia. Knocking over the single destination single countries first, Singapore Airlines is flying to Bandar Seri Begawan (BWN) in Brunei, Vientiane (VTE) in Laos, and Yangon (RGN) in Myanmar. In Cambodia, Singapore Airlines flies to both Phnom Penh (PNH) and Siem Reap (REP).

Vietnam sees Singapore Airlines flights to Da Nang (DAD), while both Scoot and Singapore Airlines fly to Hanoi (HAN) and Ho Chi Minh City (SGN). Southeast Asian countries with multiple destinations served by the Singapore Airlines Group include Indonesia, Thailand, The Philippines, and Thailand.

Scoot flies to Manado (MDC) in Indonesia while both Scoot and Singapore Airlines fly to Denpasar (DPS) and Indonesia’s capital of Jakarta (CGK). Malaysia is Scoot country, with flights to Ipoh​​​​​​​ (IPH), Kuching​​​​​​​ (KCH), Langkawi​​​​​​​ (LGK), and Miri (MYY). Singapore Airlines and Scoot fly to Kuala Lumpur (KUL) and Penang (PEN).


Scoot-Airbus-A321-neo

Scoot is carrying much of the load across shorter haul Southeast Asian routes. Photo: Airbus

In The Philippines, Scoot flies to Clark (CRK), Cebu (CEB), and Davao (DVO) while both Scoot and Singapore Airlines fly to Manila (MAN). Note that those Scoot flights to Davao and Cebu will switch over to Singapore Airlines on May 1.

Finally, Scoot and Singapore Airlines fly to four destinations in Thailand. Scoot flies to Krabi (KBV) and Chiang Mai (CNX) while Scoot and Singapore Airlines fly to Bangkok (BKK) and Phuket (HKT). Scoot flights to Hat Yai (HDY) start on April 2.

While not quite business as usual, the current Singapore Airlines Group global network is more comprehensive than most airlines. It is a good sign of recovery and ushers well for both Singapore Group airlines.


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